1800-1900, — September 13, 2011 20:47 — 0 Comments

Newry Elections 1830s

The following list of names of allegedly recalcitrant Catholic electors of the Borough of Newry in the 1832 election to Parliament (Imperial) was printed and produced to punish, by intimidation, those who had failed to wrest the seat from the agents of the landlord, the Earl of Downshire.




Denis Maguire, owner of the Bridge Street Spinning Mill failed to get elected. However three years later, the desired result was forthcoming when Denis Caulfield Brady won the seat for the Catholics of the town.

The Public Notice was headed as follows :

 

A List of the

 

C A T H O L I C

 

Electors of the Borough of Newry

 

Who betrayed the cause of Independence and their country, at the election of December 1832 and voted (or were ready to come up and vote ‘if wanted’) for a sprig of the ‘most noble’ and most stainless house of Downshire (of the validity of whose claim to those titles, the practices which its agents had recourse to on the above occasion have now fully enabled public opinion rightly to judge); and against DENIS MAGUIRE, the man of the people’s choice and A MAN FROM AMONG THE PEOPLE’S RANKS of which latter description of men freely chosen, and of which description alone, the House of Commons, to be really such, ought to consent: aye, and will yet consent, though tyrants and baser renegades may band together and do their worst.

David Barry

Lisdrumliska

Carpenter

John Boyd

Pound St

Card Maker

David Hynes alias Brady

Dublin Bridge 

Blacksmith

Bernard Bennett

High St

Shoemaker

Bernard Callaghan

Lower Commons

Labourer

Patrick Callaghan

Lower Commons

Labourer

Thomas Cullen

New Street

Labourer

Francis Cosgrave

Mill Street

Dyer

Bernard Calliley

Mill Street

Schoolmaster

Hugh Casey

Cowan Street

Brickmaker

Bernard Campbell

Lower Commons

Stone Mason

Patrick Cosgrave

Chapel Street

Mealmonger

Thomas Cunningham

Pound Street

Stone Mason

Patrick Conroy

Hill St

Hairdresser

Edward Cardiff

Canal Street

Journeyman Chandler

William Curran

Queen St

Labourer

Owen Connolly

Queen Street

Blacksmith

Terry Duffy

Bridge Street

Householder

Patrick Duffy

Ballinacraig

Labourer

Owen Downey

Lower Commons

Labourer

Patrick Dullaghan

Ballinacraig

Labourer

John Doyle

Kiln Street

Cooper

Patrick Mooney

Church Street

Brogue Maker

Edward Flanagan

Boat Street

Publican

Simon Freeman

Commons

Butcher

Owen Fallone

Temple Hill

Labourer

Andrew Fegan

Ballinacraig

Lighterman

Owen Fegan

Church St

Labourer

Hugh Fegan

Mill Street

Leather Cutter

John Flynn

High Street

Labourer

Edward Fegan

Chapel Street

Lighterman

Roger Gynne

Lower Water Street

Publican

John Garvey

Lower Commons

Labourer

Matthew Griffin

Lower Commons

Stone Mason

Charles Hull

Temple Hill

Labourer

Bernard Hughes

Canal Street

Servant

James Neale

Needham Street

Sawyer

John Hanna

Pound Street

Carman

William Hollywood

Drumalane

Lighterman

Edward Hillen

High Street

Stone Mason

 

The list of names of Catholic Newry electors (1/2 : second to follow) of 1832 reproduced here is interesting to us from several angles (which will be discussed in a subsequent article) but not from the point of view of its originally published purpose.

This was the first election following the granting of Catholic Emancipation and all of these people would, had they cast their vote, have been first-time voters. 

It is important to remember that there was neither universal franchise nor secret ballot. Indeed the list was produced, unashamedly, to finger those Catholics of Newry, who when given the vote for the first time, either failed to use it or voted against their own best interests.

But the latter is not necessarily the case. Great pressure was brought to bear by supporters of the landlord’s (Downshire : i.e. Hill) candidate, Knox: bribes were given or promised, threats were made. Businessmen and artisans depended on the largesse of landlords/debtors/patrons who might withdraw their custom or organise boycotts. 

Of course in a largely Catholic town, if it got out that Catholics had failed to support their own candidate, business was again likely to suffer. No doubt, that was what was hoped for by the authors of this list. 

The establishment triumphed in this and the following election – the Catholic candidate Denis Maguire being defeated – but in 1835, a relative, Denis Caulfield Brady succeeded, becoming the first Catholic in many generations to represent Newry and the first to go to the Imperial Parliament in London. 

The establishment fought back in the press in equally dirty fashion.

This is the next article but one!

 

… more later …

 

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