Chapel St residents

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On the far side of the street from Quay Street corner, at 2 Chapel Street lived the Campbells. They had two entrances to their home, one on the street and one down Granny Hughes’ entry. The photo below shows an early family photo. Rita, recently deceased, was the dear wife of Terry, our Editor’s walking companion.

Originally posted 2005-04-23 14:07:47. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Meadow Memories 8

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The favourite game of all was Tig around the Block. It involved literally dozens of us, boys, and occasionally a few girls and was played not just Round the Block but as far afield as The Pighall Loanan, Derrybeg, Sandy’s Field, The Line, The Plaits, The Bricky Loanan and all areas within, especially other people’s back gardens. Played on this scale, there had to be a whole team ‘on it’. The more dedicated of us played the game with surprising intensity and military discipline.

Originally posted 2019-05-29 16:14:45. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Local Parlance

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In the wake of the culvert explosion near his home, the Cross’ man was admitted to Daisy Hill Hospital for observation. 

‘Did your bowels move yet?’ the staff nurse asked solicitously. 

‘Bouls, is it?’ he roared. 

‘Amn’t I tellin’ ye, the whole effin’ dresser came crashing to the flure?’ 

He thought she was referring to the breakfast crockery.





Originally posted 2004-01-29 00:00:00. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Close Shave: 3

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Still shrouded in darkness I made my way across the Stone Bridge, over Sugar Island and then onwards up Canal Street towards home.

Originally posted 2007-10-12 12:44:09. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Bagenal deaths

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In 1567 Nicholas Bagenal eventually returned to favour with the English administration courtesy of friends in high places such as his patron Robert Dudley, the Earl of Leicester (Nicholas named one of his three sons Dudley) who himself was a friend of Queen’s favourite Sir Henry Sidney  (a few times Lord Deputy of Ireland).

Originally posted 2008-11-30 14:19:41. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Annalong

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The results of the recent inquiry into the fishing boat loss outside Annalong remind us of how dangerous this occupation is. There is hardly a year without a number of local drownings.

Originally posted 2006-08-10 11:26:22. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Big Pat

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Around the Bridge, on a winter’s eve

A whisper blew between the trees

A chance so rare, to meet and see

A local, world celebrity

Originally posted 2008-11-06 08:59:57. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Mum’s Baking

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I came upon this recently and reflected how true the sentiments and situation were for me and for generations before me.  I don’t know the author.

‘The rain poured down in bucketfuls as I cycled home from college some four miles away from our cottage.  It was a most welcome sight as I turned into the boreen leading to it.  I threw my bike against the wall and ignored Shep’s welcoming barks.  The warmth of the kitchen fire met me as I entered. 

Originally posted 2004-05-25 00:00:00. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

My tough childhood

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Dear Agnes

Although I might now be described as middle-class (I own a period house [3 ‘sitting-rooms’!] in a rural setting (well, except that the countryside is dotted with similar mansions) a BMW and a Lexus – and a run around SUV of course) – there was a time when we had very little indeed.

Originally posted 2008-03-05 11:02:57. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Street Rhymes

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Skipping, hop-scotch and juggling up to three balls against a wall were the exclusive pursuits of young girls in my day.  All were accompanied by rhymes either short or long.  I was envious that this ‘poetry’ was not for us boys, and gob-smacked that every girl knew them all by heart.  I would be delighted if any older ‘girl’ who remembers those I do not, would contact the Journal with their words!  Below are just a few that I do recall.




When I was young I had no sense
I bought a fiddle for eighteen pence
But the only tune that I could play
Was ‘Over the hills and far away’.

Originally posted 2004-03-02 00:00:00. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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