Folklore

John McCullagh February 10, 2004

George Paterson, folklorist and archivist, collected sayings of the aul people as he travelled the country.  Here is a selection. ‘A crowd of hares used till gather in the wee forth [fort] at night.  They used till just sit there an’ even the ‘grue’ [greyhound] that cud see them well wud luk the other way.  […]

John McCullagh January 31, 2004

Kevin McAllister was ‘hired out’ from the hiring fair at the top of North Street, where the Butter and Egg Market was then located.  Later the hiring was done at the bottom of Mill Street. 

John McCullagh January 30, 2004

Have you noticed the absence of street ‘characters’ over recent decades?  If it wasn’t for Bearded Marty, ever present at all hours of the day and night, we’d have totally lost all ‘local colour’ – as my schoolmaster used to put it!  Stop and chat with him some time – he’s got an interesting life […]

John McCullagh January 22, 2004

Bridget Hanratty, the last of our local Travelling Women, came to the door well equipped to receive the ‘charities’ that were happily and freely offered.  Despite this, she protested loudly when she was given money, or a few eggs, of a bowl of flour or meal, and potatoes for her sack.

John McCullagh December 29, 2003

The Fairy Tree is in folklore, often associated with raths/hill forts of old, the little people of the underworld preferring to commune [sometimes through the souterrains often attending these sites] with the ancient rather than the modern peoples.