John McCullagh September 29, 2003

  I hesitated to ascribe the previous story to an ‘act of God’. Not so this one.     ‘The hillside was a well-known area for young lovers,’ explained the police chief. ‘Unfortunately it also attracts voyeurs spying on their antics.    These three men were peeping toms who liked to hide in an old broken-down […]

John McCullagh September 25, 2003

6. Fun of the Fair How bright the light is near the sea! We look down upon the fishing boats lying askew on the shining mud. Above these, the drunken tangle of wayward masts, around which graceful gulls glide, tirelessly wheeling, their hungry eyes questing, forever complaining as if they felt perpetually victimized.

John McCullagh September 25, 2003

Gerry Monaghan’s Memories 10 Mindful of its gloomy history, I have always regarded the quarry with thoughtful apprehension. Despite this, as an older boy I would go fishing for spricks (sticklebacks) in its clouded, enigmatic waters. The spricks were much bigger here and so more desirable. Later as teenagers, filled with the wild daring of […]

John McCullagh September 24, 2003

 Last run on the Bessbrook tram One local reporter shared the last tram run to Bessbrook, as it set out from the Edward Street terminus in January 1948, with a young boy, and one man and one woman.  This is his story.  In answer to his query, Mrs Hannah J Copeland replied that departure time […]

John McCullagh September 23, 2003

History of Newry Workhouse   [Part 2] by John McCullagh BA , BSc Prior to the 1830s some little local Poor Relief was sporadically offered – mainly through the Churches – in almshouses to orphans and to the most destitute.  Under the Poor Law Act of that decade a central Board, known until 1847 as the Poor […]

John McCullagh September 23, 2003

  I confess to scepticism over the need for these Assertiveness Courses.   [I assume you heard of the two nuns leaving the college? One turned to the other and remarked, ‘Mother Superior, aren’t these Self Assertion Classes just f***ing  great?’].     

John McCullagh September 17, 2003

No relief from poverty in Ireland existed before the 1840s, when 106 Poor Law Unions were established throughout Ireland. Newry Union, one of the largest and covering an area roughly equivalent to that of Newry and Mourne Council, provided indoor relief for 1,000 paupers. The Clerk of the Union and the Master who worked under […]

John McCullagh September 17, 2003

Northern Ireland’s post war housing stock was worse than that of any other part of the United Kingdom, despite having been spared the worst of the German blitz.  Most houses had been built before the First World War and they were grossly inadequate in quantity as well as in quality.     

John McCullagh September 15, 2003

Mindful of its gloomy history, I have always regarded the quarry with thoughtful apprehension. Despite this, as an older boy I would go fishing for spricks (sticklebacks) in its clouded, enigmatic waters. The spricks were much bigger here and so more desirable.

John McCullagh September 14, 2003

Pangur Ban ‘I and Pangur Ban my cat ‘Tis a like task we are at:Hunting mice is his delightHunting words I sit all night Better far than praise of men ‘Tis to sit with book and pen;Pangur bears me no ill will,He too plies his simple skill. ‘Tis a merry thing to seeAt our tasks […]