O’Neills to Squire Jackson

c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-13–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-12–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-11–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-10–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-9–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-8–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-7–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-6–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-5–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-4–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-3–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-2–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-1–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-0–>span lang=”EN-GB” style=”font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana;”>At the time of the Ulster Plantation, immediately following the Flight of the Earls, Owen MacHugh O’Neill, son of Hugh M

But it was not to be an easy or long-lasting settlement. The fragile relationship between the conquering English and the ‘co-operating’ leaders of the old Gaelic Order was repeatedly riven over the course of the seventeenth century. Remaining clan leaders, including the O’Neills of Glasdrumman and the descendants of Oghie

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