Merchants Quay 1938

c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-13–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-12–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-11–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-10–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-9–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-8–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-7–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-6–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-5–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-4–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-3–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-2–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-1–>c505218304b50c59c3659f6dda43bae7-links-0–>font size=”2″>They were calmer, more relaxed times then.  Only the shopowners – in this case, Long’s Grocery Store, O’Hagan’s Hardware, Mitchell’s General Wares – and the ‘gentry’ –  perhaps the manager of the Tax Office in the foreground – owned cars.


And what beautiful cars!  Fords, mostly – you can have any colour so long as it’s black!

Not a pedestrian in sight.

The photo is taken from Godfrey Bridge and the stump to the right foreground is of the guider timbers to help the shire horses draw their canal barges through the road bridge.

How few of you remember all this!

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